Celebrate Global Child Nutrition Month

April is Global Child Nutrition Month, focused on raising awareness and funds for school meal programs in developing nations. As a mother of a four-year-old, I know just how important a full belly is for Jake’s attitude, his behaviour, and his attention span. So imagining how a child’s day at school is impacted when they haven’t had breakfast or don’t know where their next meal will come from is simple. Adequate nutrition is essential for learning and childhood development.

 

The Global Child Nutrition Foundation was created in 2006 to improve access to nutritional food for the world’s school children. Their approach is unique in that they work with local farmers to source healthy food, improving local economies in the process. School meals encourage student attendance and also support learning. This sustainable approach expands opportunities for 65 million children to have access to nutritious, locally-sourced school meals.

 

Inspired by the work that GCNF is doing? Join me in celebrating Global Child Nutrition Month with one of these ideas below:

 

Host a Fundraising Event

Hosting an event to raise money for a cause is a great way to make a significant impact. Plus, organizing a fundraiser is not as complicated as you think! You can use a simple online fundraising platform to sell tickets and track RSVPs. Think about getting a group of friends together to share responsibilities. Plus you can get creative with some unique fundraising ideas that fit with your interests!

 

Engage on Social Media

If hosting a fundraiser or making a personal donation is not an option for you right now, you can still help by spreading awareness for Global Child Nutrition Month. Follow GCNF on Facebook and share with your friends. Or post on Instagram about how you’re inspiring nutrition in your local community and use the hashtag #GCNF.

 

 

Inspire Healthy Eating With Your Children

Think about ways you can teach the children in your life about proper nutrition. Start by involving your kids in meal planning, grocery shopping, and even meal prep. Even young children can learn by making choices (apple or carrot sticks?) or helping you prepare some no-cook snacks. When they are involved, they’re more likely to try new foods. Visiting a farmers market is another great way to learn where food comes from and have your children meet the farmers who grow it. Teaching healthy habits early will instil lifelong habits, and possibly inspire the global activists of tomorrow!

 

Em xx

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