Smart Ways to Get Your Teen Invested in Their Education

teens
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Access to education is an incredible gift. It gives students the opportunity to grow in self-knowledge and gain the skills they need to succeed in their future careers. However, your teen will only get as much out of their education as they’re willing to put in.

Unfortunately, many teenagers only see the stressful side of school. They don’t value their education because they would rather be doing anything else. Many school environments only make this worse. Here are six smart ways you can help to get your teen invested in their education.

1.   De-emphasize Performance

Many teenagers feel crushed by the weight of expectation. They’re overwhelmed with too many classes and extracurricular activities. On top of that, many teens are navigating stressful relationships and trying to plan for their future. All of this can take away the joy and interest they find in learning.

You can help your teen love school again by reducing this pressure. Remind them that their lives have meaning and purpose apart from school. If they fail every class, that’s okay. There is more than one path to success in life. Help your teen develop strong values and a sense of self that’s separate from the grades they make and the status they hold at school.

2.   Have Them Volunteer

In America, it’s easy to undervalue your education. You can help your teen learn to appreciate their schooling through volunteer opportunities. Have them join an educational program where they’re tutoring other kids, helping with summer school or teaching other kids to read. Teaching is one of the best ways for your student to really learn.

Volunteering will also show them that not everyone has the same opportunities. Giving back to others can be a motivator that helps your teen invest more seriously in their own studies. Once your child becomes aware of how rare educational opportunities are, they’ll be more present and grateful for every day of school they can attend.

3.   Instill Good Habits

Lack of discipline can increase your teen’s stress during the school year. If they aren’t sleeping enough, eating nutritious meals and practicing good time management, they’ll feel a constant strain. Eventually, this can lead to sickness or an emotional breakdown. Stress also shuts down your brain so that it’s difficult to learn and retain new information.

Good habits will benefit your teen throughout their lives. You can help them get started by practicing healthy habits together. Set a bedtime routine and help them follow it. Empower them to put away distractions and focus during study time. Teach them the value of breaks and how nutrition affects their body and mind. Good habits will equip your teen to reach their life goals with confidence.

4.   Make Them Work

This might sound harsh, but getting a job can seriously improve your child’s commitment to their education. When teens work, they learn to value their time in a new way. They begin to understand that life doesn’t owe them anything. Instead of taking things for granted, they’ll learn to appreciate every aspect of their lives.

If your teen has to work to put themselves through college, they’re more likely to pay attention in class. Instead of something they have to do, schoolwork will become something they choose to do. You can start them on this journey to responsibility by encouraging them to work part-time in high school. The skills they gain in the workplace will strengthen their college performance and teach them the value of personal effort.

5.   Support Their Interests

It’s much easier to learn about something you love than something you could care less about. You can foster your teen’s love of learning by supporting their interests, both in and outside of school. For example, if your teenager is fascinated by biology, you could encourage them to take an AP biology course at school.

Following their passions will encourage curiosity and engagement in their education. Every skill your teen learns will build their confidence and help guide their future, even if it’s something niche like mushroom hunting or painting intricate Easter eggs. Supporting your teen’s interests is a great way to show them that education shouldn’t be confined to the classroom.

6.   Build Life Skills

Many teenagers disengage from school because they don’t see a point in what they’re learning. In some cases, this feeling of burnout is fair – for example, a teen who wants to become an engineer may feel frustrated at having to take advanced English classes. Many teenagers want to be done with high school so they can start living adult lives.

You can encourage your teen by teaching them life skills and adding meaning to their official classes. For example, your teenager needs to learn financial responsibility, how to care for themselves mentally and physically, how to exercise without injury and how to rest well. Remind your student of their life goals and how finishing high school will help them move forward.

Learning Is a Life-Long Investment

Teens who take charge of their education can benefit so much from what they’re learning. Follow these six steps to help your student take responsibility and develop the self-motivational skills they need to succeed as an adult. When they learn to value their education, they’ll begin to treat learning as a serious investment in their futures.

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